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    Northland College
   
 
  Jul 23, 2017
 
 
    
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2013-2014 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Pre-Professional Curricula



Most professional schools advise prospective students to develop a solid foundation in the liberal arts as the best preparation for admission. Consistent with this advice, Northland College does not offer designated pre-professional majors; instead, students interested in pursuing a professional degree after graduation from Northland are encouraged to complete a regular major and to choose elective courses that further prepare them for the professional field of their choice.

For assistance in developing an undergraduate course of study that will facilitate admittance into specific professional schools, students are encouraged to research the requirements of specific professional schools in their areas of interest and to meet with Northland College faculty members who have been designated as pre-professional advisors.

The recommendations below are intended to provide general guidance for students interested in pursuing post-baccalaureate professional training.

Pre-Law

The American Bar Association, the American Association of Law Schools, and pre-law advising organizations all agree that a solid liberal arts education is the best preparation for law school. Because of this, law schools accept students with a wide variety of majors and backgrounds.

Northland College encourages students interested in pursuing a law degree to meet with the pre-law faculty advisor, Paul Schue. Students are also encouraged to select a major that has relevance to the type of law they expect to practice in the future and to pursue a course of study that hones the following skills and values, all of which are crucial to the successful practice of law:

  • analytical and problem-solving skills;
  • critical reading skills;
  • writing skills;
  • oral communication and listening skills;
  • general research skills;
  • task organization and management skills;
  • values of serving faithfully the interests of others while promoting justice.

Finally, because law school curricula are demanding and because law schools admission officers look for demonstrated achievement by applicants, students interested in attending law school should select challenging courses and develop the self-discipline required to do well in those courses.

Pre-Medicine (including Dental)

The American Association of Medical Colleges recommends a solid liberal education preparation for medical science professions. Students planning to enter medical science professions should pursue a course of study that meets professional school entrance requirements, regardless of major. In addition, students should plan extracurricular time for volunteer and service activities and prepare for the MCAT exam.

Because entrance requirements change from year to year and differ among schools, students are encouraged to work closely with the pre-medicine advisor, Wendy Gorman, and to become familiar with the requirements of the professional schools to which they plan to apply. In general though, the following coursework is recommended (note that AP credit may not be accepted at some medical schools without taking additional college courses):

  • two semesters of inorganic chemistry with lab;
  • two semesters of organic chemistry with lab;
  • one semester of biochemistry;
  • two semesters of physics with lab;
  • one semester of calculus;
  • one semester of statistics;
  • two semesters of biology (one of which is advanced);
  • writing as a stand-alone course or another course with an extensive writing requirement;
  • courses in the humanities and social sciences in preparation for the social, psychological, and economic aspects of medical practice.

Pre-Ministry

Consistent with other pre-professional studies, seminaries and divinity schools encourage a solid, broad liberal arts course of study as the best preparation for success at the graduate level. Students must work closely with the pre-ministry advisor, David Saetre, to determine the best course of study for the denomination and seminary of choice.

This course of study will include a major relevant to the kind of ministry a student intends to pursue. For example, a student interested in outdoor and camping ministries should take advantage of the college's strong program in outdoor education, combined with general studies in the humanities and in religion. Students interested in parish ministry should select a major in the humanities or the social sciences, with additional coursework in religion.

Pre-ministry students must also choose courses that develop critical thinking and communication skills as they prepare for graduate seminary studies. These skills include analytical thinking, clear and concise writing, critical reading, oral communication, independent research, and task management. Students will further enhance their success by developing their knowledge of intellectual history, including religion and philosophy. Finally, students should choose courses that help them grow intellectually and personally—courses that challenge the heart as well as the mind—in order develop the depth of character and the appreciation of others that ministry requires.

Pre-Veterinarian Medicine

The Association of American Veterinary Medicine Colleges recommends a solid liberal education preparation for veterinary medicine professions. Students planning to enter veterinary science professions should pursue a course of study that meets professional school entrance requirements, regardless of major. In addition, students should plan extracurricular time for volunteer and service activities and prepare for the GRE exam.

Because entrance requirements change from year to year and differ among schools, students are encouraged to work closely with the pre-vetinary advisor, Wendy Gorman, and to become familiar with the requirements of the veterinary schools to which they plan to apply. In general, though, the following coursework is recommended (note that AP credit may not be accepted at some veterinary schools without taking additional college courses):

  • one semester of general biology or zoology with lab;
  • one semester of genetics;
  • one semester of microbiology;
  • two semesters of inorganic chemistry with lab;
  • two semesters of organic chemistry with lab;
  • one semester of biochemistry;
  • two semesters of physics with lab;
  • one semester of calculus;
  • two semesters of writing or courses with an extensive writing requirement;
  • courses in humanities and social sciences in preparation for the social, psychological, and business aspects of veterinary practice.